The Coast Walk Project

Coast Walk 13: Hunters Beach to East Point, Seal Harbor; Part 3

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August 27, 2015: 2:21-4:15pm. 77ºF (25ºC). Breezy and sunny with puffy clouds. Chickadees, crickets, grasshoppers, dragonflies, bees, mosquito larvae, starfish, breadcrumb sponges, a flock of anonymous ducks, and 3 crows.

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No companions today, just me celebrating my 48th birthday by photographing bugs and poop. When I’m alone, I look around more carefully and spend more time watching seawater evaporate and bugs crawl, so this one will be heavy on photos and light on text.

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It was perfect height-of-summer weather: breezy and sunny with puffy clouds in a deep blue sky.  I could hear chickadees off in the woods, and crickets and grasshoppers chirping in the grass. There were dozens of dragonflies in the air and tons of bees on the asters.

I started out at the Maine Coast Heritage Trust parking area on Cooksey Drive

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and headed downhill through a scrubby growth of young red maple, asters, raspberry-ish canes, alder, chokecherry, viburnum, bracken, low juniper, spruce trees, and bayberry.

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Evening Primrose (Oenothera biennis)

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Looking back towards Hunters Head.

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And looking south toward the Cranberry Islands. You can just make out the monument on East Bunker Ledge out there in the Eastern Way.

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There was poison ivy everywhere  – I’d never thought of it as a seaside plant, but it was growing in cracks in the cliffs beside seaside goldenrod and wild roses.

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Oh yeah, I finally bought new hiking boots!

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Wild Harebell (Campanula rotundifolia) growing in a granite cleft.

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I’ve been told this enormous quartz vein runs clear across the island.

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Probably raccoon poo. Maybe fox? Something that likes fruit, anyway.

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Seaside Goldenrod (Solidago sempervirens)

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Bittersweet Nightshade (Solanum dulcamara), native to Europe and invasive here in Maine. This stuff is everywhere.

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Mosquito larvae and pupae (the larvae are the skinny, wiggly ones and the pupae are the dark, oval ones.)

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Heavy traffic in the Eastern Way.

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Gosh that was fun!

 

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